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Nightcap sees sales rocket as drinkers flood back to its bars

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London Cocktail Club owner Nightcap has said recent sales have smashed its expectations as drinkers flooded back to its bars since indoor seating was allowed on 17 May.

The group, co-founded and led by former Dragons’ Den investor Sarah Willingham, also said its management teams were ‘travelling around the UK looking for new properties’ as the group continues to take advantage of the crisis to expand its stable of bars. 

Revenues rose 92 per cent in the last three weeks since the reopening of indoor hospitality compared to the same period in 2019, before the pandemic struck, with like-for-like sales up 53 per cent. 

Back to the bars: Sales at Nightcap’s 19 bars rose 92% in the last three weeks

The performance across its 19 bars in London, Bristol and Birmigham was well ahead of its expectations, Nightcap said, especially given that the bars have ‘restricted capacity’ due to social distancing requirements.

Shares in Nightcap jumped as much as 18 per cent in early trading following the update. They were up by a smaller 4.4 per cent to 24p by 11am on Tuesday.   

The group owns the London Cocktail Club, a chain of 12 premium bars in London and Bristol.

Last month, it also took over Adventure Bar Group and its seven bars, which include Luna Springs in Birmingham and Bar Elba, a rooftop bar in London’s Waterloo. 

Weekly sales at the newly acquired bars hit an all-time, cumulative record of more than £520,000, the company said as it notched up 96 per cent growth compared to 2019. 

‘Particularly encouraging’ were sales at Luna Springs, its first outdoor bar in Birmingham which opened on 12 April this year, as well as Tonight Josephine, also in Birmingham – the first of the chain to open outside London.     

It added that if all lockdown restrictions are not lifted on June 21, it still has ‘confidence that all sites will continue to trade well’ even with current social distancing limits remaining in place.  

Former Dragon Den’s investor Sarah Willingham is Nightcap’s co-founder and chief executive

Nightcap floated on London’s junior AIM market in January and recently raised £10million to help fund its acquisition of the Adventure Bar Group, more than doubling its initial fundraising target.

The stock market debut came shortly after it bought the London Cocktail Club for an initial £5.7million sum.

The group has been looking to take advantage of attractive property opportunities in the hospitality sector following the impact of the pandemic. 

‘The Group continues to expand its opening pipeline for the next three years,’ it said in a statement today.

‘Our management teams are travelling around the UK looking for new properties and we have a number of sites that are currently in legal negotiations across several of the Group’s brands.’

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We try a confidence driving course to see if classes offered can get drivers safely back on the road

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Until last week I hadn’t driven in five years, since the day I passed my test. Living in London, like many I rely on public transport and the thought of owning a car in the capital feels a little frivolous given its superb public transport links. 

But recently, I had started to yearn for hitting the open road again and to step back into the driving seat for that taste of freedom I spent so many hours working towards in my early-20s.

With holidays at home looking like the only option again this year, hiring a rental car is starting to sound much more appealing – but I feel too out of practice to simply take the plunge and do it.

Instead, I took up the offer a driving confidence course from a company called Drive Doctors.

Many say they have lost their confidence in driving since the pandemic, NFU Mutual has said

Mark Johnston is the founder and it recently teamed up with insurance giant NFU Mutual to help people get safely back on the road after many stopped driving during lockdown. 

While he says Drive Doctors was started nine years ago to help younger drivers in rural areas learn how to drive safely in more urban areas, this has now expanded to include anyone, of any age, who wants to become more confident in their driving. 

Lockdown has been a catalyst for more people to sign up to the service as not driving for such a long period of time has led to one in four drivers becoming nervous about getting back on the road when restrictions are fully eased, research by NFU Mutual found.

To help ease them back onto the streets, the insurer gifted 1,000 driving confidence sessions to its car and light goods vehicle insurance customers via Drive Doctors.

As someone who sits in the slightly nervous driver category, I decided going on one of the courses would be a good opportunity to test my abilities and hopefully ensure I would feel safe enough to drive alone in the future. 

I was certain I would not be able to remember how to start the engine, let alone drive on a dual carriageway – but all of my fears disappeared quickly. 

Rather than trying to drive for the first time in London – after all I initially learnt in my quiet hometown of Eastbourne – I was offered the chance to go to Bedford Autodrome where the chances of me crashing are slim.

The large racing track has played host to a number of celebrities – and even royalty – over the years with miles of space to cover.   

Previous driving experience 

Whilst Grace enjoyed her driving lesson, she is probably not quite ready for the race track

Before the session started I was worried about how I would find navigating a car again as my previous driving experience was tumultuous.

I started learning at 17 and I failed my first practical test before heading off to university where learning to drive took a backseat.

I started again, with a different instructor, at 22, having to retake my theory test as the two year time limit had passed.

Another two attempts at the practical later and I had finally passed my test never to drive again, until last week.

I reckon a fair few people are in a similar situation – they have their full licence, but live in cities and thus get completely out of practice.  

The thought of being in control of a vehicle after a long break is certainly nerve wracking for many with 45 per cent of drivers saying they would be interested in a confidence session.

In particular, 39 per cent said they would most welcome training on how to use their vehicle in an emergency situation, such as skidding on ice.

45% of people told NFU Mutual that they would be interested in a driver confidence session

How the session works 

The first thing Mark, a race car driver turned safe driving teacher, was keen to do was highlight that the session wasn’t a lesson, rather time to get reacquainted with knowledge you already have. 

After driving me from Bedford station to the Autodrome, we swapped seats in a quiet part of the track where no other cars were around. 

This was the first time I had driven any other car than a Mini Cooper – it was a Ford Fiesta – and the only time I had been in a vehicle where the passenger did not have dual controls, meaning I had full autonomy.  

Before actually setting off, I registered Mark’s concern when I told him the best way I could remember the pedals was by saying ‘can’t be a*sed’ – clutch, break, accelerate.

However, to my surprise – and his – the first part of the drive was much easier than I thought it would be. I easily found the biting point and started driving away, slowly.

He asked if there was anything in particular I needed help with – something he does with all clients to ensure they get the most out of their time – which for me was simply changing gears confidently. 

After several, slow, laps around the Autodrome practicing this, Mark suggested we tried moving to the public roads. 

I progressed from 30mph to 70mph, moving away from the track and driving around the Bedford countryside where I drove on the dual carriageway and successfully navigated a three lane roundabout, which boosted my confidence. 

The skills I had learnt years prior, including checking mirrors carefully came back to me. 

Only on a couple of occasions did I find myself veering a bit too close to the kerb with my steering somewhat clunky. 

As we drove, Mark told me many of those who have signed up to do a confidence course are mature adults looking to build confidence in their ability again. 

Some of the customers include a woman who had a fear of driving over bridges while another was a man with early onset dementia who wanted to feel confident enough to drive whilst he still could.     

Mark Johnston is a former racing driver who now works with motorists on confidence courses

How can I complete a session? 

Confidence driving sessions have proved popular. When NFU Mutual offered the chance for customers to have a confidence lesson, interest was high with more than 2,000 people applying in less than half an hour – despite only 1,000 places being available. 

The sessions were offered after research showed driving support was highly requested.  

However, at the moment this isn’t a product that people can buy from NFU Mutual.

What they can do is book them separately themselves with sessions with Drive Doctors costing £150 that ordinarily take place in the customers own car with the instructor travelling to them.

Sessions take about two hours and all are tailored to the individual driver with the instructor calling in advance to ask what aspects of driving they are least confident with and set some learning goals.

On arrival, customers do a vehicle-check together and then drive a pre-planned route which would cover as many driving scenarios as possible. 

Afterwards the driver receives a report outlining goals, progress and any advice for the future with the instructor offering a follow-up call a week later. 

Other companies that offer confidence courses include RED, The AA and BSM, while it is worth checking with local independent instructors to see if they offer any packages.

The two hour refresher was in my opinion well worth it and I now cannot wait to start driving solo. 

At the end of the session, both Mark and I were pleased with my progress and I was relieved to know I would feel safe, and confident enough, to drive on the roads by myself. 

While I might not be ready for the busy streets of London, I would certainly feel happy hiring and driving a car around a quieter seaside town on my future holidays.

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The banks and building societies which pay better rates to loyal savers

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It is a commonly uttered truism in personal finance that loyalty doesn’t pay.

After years of complaints, the city regulator a fortnight ago announced proposals to clamp down on the practice of insurance companies cashing in on customer loyalty in the form of successively higher premiums.

And the same is often true in the world of savings. Savers who have been with their bank or building society for a long time are often the first to bear the brunt of any cuts.

Loyalty often doesn’t pay for savers, but some banks do reward existing customers

Providers take the knife to the rates paid on their back books safe in the knowledge very few people switch.

Indeed, a 2018 study by the Financial Conduct Authority found just one in 10 holders of easy-access savings accounts and Isas had switched in the last three years.

Meanwhile, accounts opened more than half a decade ago, constituting 60 per cent of the entire savings market, were being paid 0.42 percentage points less interest than newer savings accounts.

Loyalty, therefore, literally doesn’t pay for savers in most cases.

But in a minority of situations it can. While This is Money always recommends readers shop around using our best buy tables, in some cases remaining loyal to one bank or building society can pay off.

Last week, Yorkshire Building Society, the country’s third-largest mutual, announced plans to dish out £16million in the form of higher rates for loyal savers, on top of a £20million boost announced in January.

It means a 0.2 percentage point top-up to many of its savings rates, with easy-access accounts and Isas opened prior to 29 January this year increased to 0.5 per cent or 0.55 per cent last Wednesday.

While some may turn their noses up at such a slight increase, at a time when rates on easy-access accounts barely touch half-a-percent, it is at least a step in the right direction.

The mutual has also launched a pair of accounts solely aimed at existing customers, one paying 0.65 per cent and allowing six withdrawals a year, and a regular saver paying 3.5 per cent on between £10 and £500 of savings a month which can be accessed after 12 months.

Building societies, due to the fact they are owned by their members rather than shareholders, can pay better rates in the form of a dividend. Think of Yorkshire’s giveaway as akin to a £36million payout.

Nationwide Building Society, Britain’s largest, has a target to offer ‘member benefits’ worth £400million a year, in the form of additional ‘value’ provided to its savers and borrowers.

It undershot that target by £135million in 2020-21 after slashing its savings rates, but in its latest financial results chief financial officer Chris Rhodes said he expected the mutual to exceed it again ‘in the medium term’.

Meanwhile, regulations mean at least 50 per cent of their lending is funded by deposits made by their members, which they have to pay for.

Often, it is far more. For example, £33.4billion of Yorkshire Building Society’s £47.9billion in assets, or loans, was funded by everyday savers last year, according to its latest results.

At the same time, as of the end of December it had drawn just £450million in low-cost funding from the Bank of England’s latest Term Funding Scheme, launched last March in a bid to pump cheap money into banks and building societies to keep them lending.

Others, like Nationwide and Coventry, Britain’s second-largest mutual, have drawn down billions of pounds more, but it still pales in comparison to the amount of money they have taken from savers.

Although they differ on what they think it is, Britain’s four major building societies all use their latest financial results to the point to the fact they outperform the market average when it comes to their savings rates. 

And Coventry and Leeds, the fourth-largest, paid 1.18 per cent and 1.19 per cent on average, far above the standard market rate. There can also be benefits in the form of lotteries or other giveaways.

Do building societies pay better rates? 
  All easy-access accounts  On-sale easy-access accounts  Closed easy-access accounts 
Market average 0.25% 0.15%  0.26% 
Building society average (45 providers) 0.26%  0.18%  0.28% 
Bank average (109 providers) 0.24%  0.12%  0.26% 
Source: Savings Champion 

Nationwide recently launched its fourth savings lottery in the last 15 months, with a £1million prize fund open to everyone who is or becomes a customer by the of August.

It also spiced up Isa season somewhat after launching an 18-month fixed-rate Isa which offered a £50 bonus to existing customers who transferred £10,000 into it. 

The deal, now off-sale, was nothing to sniff at in its own right, beating every cash Isa with a term shorter than three years.

Average rates on on-sale easy-access accounts offered by 45 building societies were a third higher than those offered by 109 banks, figures from Savings Champion show. 

When it came to all accounts, both ‘closed’ ones and on-sale ones, building societies still outperformed banks, but only by 0.02 percentage points.

However paying higher rates to loyal savers is not limited to member-owned mutuals. 

While major high street banks are happy to pay long-time savers as little as 0.01 per cent, or £1 interest on every £10,000 of savings, some smaller and challenger banks are more equitable.

Ford Money, which funds auto finance lending for the parent car company of the same name, vows to pay existing easy-access savers the same as new ones. 

Its flexible saver is currently off-sale at the moment, but the tax-free version is currently available and pays 0.3 per cent.

However, that is lower than the current best buy of 0.46 per cent available from Cynergy Bank.

And Wrexham-based savings bank SmartSave, part of Chetwood Financial Group, also offers preferential or the same offers to its existing customers, which are those who currently hold a fixed-rate savings deal with the bank.

In future this could potentially be extended to all customers who have ever banked with SmartSave, according to its commercial director, Julia McColl.

Although its accounts are currently off-sale to newcomers, the bank, which has a £200million balance sheet, is paying 0.85 per cent on a one-year fixed-rate bond, which would be enough for second place in our best buy tables.

Its other fixed-rate deals pay between 1 per cent and 1.45 per cent on terms of two to five years.

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Ten things you need to know about Bugatti’s new £3.3m Chiron Super Sport

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Bugatti is the hypercar maker that doesn’t do things by halves – and its new Chiron Super Sport is one of its most outrageous road-legal models yet.

Officially unveiled this morning, the stunning limited-edition road car is based on the £2.5million ‘standard’ Chiron but offers increased performance, improved aerodynamics and a few nods to former Super Sport models from the brand’s illustrious history.

According to the boss at the Molsheim motor maker, the new Chiron Super Sport is ‘the ultimate grand tourer’ – as well as being the most powerful combustion-engined road car money can buy.

Here are 10 things you need to know about the latest bonkers Bugatti…  

Bugatti’s latest Chiron hypercar: Say hello to the limited edition Chiron Super Sport – a £3.3million grand tourer you can take on holiday

The new road-legal Chiron Super Sport was unveiled by the French brand – owned by the VW Group – on Tuesday morning

1. It will cost £3.3million if you wanted to buy one in the UK

It is not cheap. 

The French brand says it will be priced at €3.2million, and that’s before taxes.

For a UK buyer, that’s £2.75million before you’ve even considered adding VAT. Bolt that onto the figure and the total fee is a whopping £3.3million.

That’s some way short of Bugatti’s most expensive car ever – the one-of-a-kind La Voiture Noire, launched in 2019. Also based on the Chiron, the ultra-exclusive hypercar had an asking price of £11.3million.

The Super Sport is unquestionably super pricey, but it doesn’t get within a sniff of making it into the top 10 new vehicles with the most extortionate price tags – you can see the full list in our feature on the Rolls-Royce Boat Tail, which was unveiled just last month. 

UK buyers will hard to fork out around £2.75million before taking into consideration VAT. Bolt the tax onto the figure and the total fee is a whopping £3.3million

The new Super Sport (left) might be expensive but it’s nowhere near the top of the list of priciest Bugattis from new. That crown goes to the La Voiture Noire (right) – a one-off super-stealth hypercar unveiled in 2019 with a price tag of £11.4million with VAT

At £3.3million, the Chiron Super Sport is just a fraction of the price of the most expensive car in the world – the Roll-Royce Boat Tail that was revealed in May

2. It’s based on the Chiron Super Sport 300+, the world’s ‘unofficial’ fastest road car

If this car’s shape looks familiar, that’s because it shares its extended bodywork with the £4.2million Chiron Super Sport 300+, which unofficially claims to be the fastest road car cash can buy.

It clocked a top speed of 304.77mph on 2 August 2019, though its outright record claim remains in question as it was only measured driving in one direction (Guinness World Records stipulates the top speed has to be an average of two runs in opposite directions on the same piece of tarmac set within an hour of each other).

For a top speed record to be recognised by Guinness World Records it needs to be an average of the highest speeds set in both directions of the same track. Bugatti confirmed that the Chiron Super Sport 300+ was only driven in one direction

Bugatti said in 2017 that it couldn’t complete the two runs at the VW test track in Germany because driving the car at such excessive speeds in the opposite direction would go against the grain of the surface, which could cause the tyres to overheat and explode

It means the Koenigsegg Agera RS’s 277.8mph , confirmed in 2017, is still recognised by Guinness World Records as the official fastest top speed for a road car.

This new Chiron Super Sport is tuned as much for comfort as it is for blistering speed, says the French car firm that’s owned by the VW Group – as long as you’re happy to take your £3.3million out on the road from Monday to Sunday. 

With a more relaxed drive in mind, Bugatti has electronically limited the top speed to 273mph. That’s almost four times the speed limit on a UK motorway. Hardly pedestrian, is it?

This is the Bugatti Chiron Supersport 300+. It’s a £4.2million version of the standard hypercar with the extended carbon bodywork and upgraded exhaust system from the record-smashing example

Just 30 examples of this black and orange Chiron Super Sport 300+ will be produced – around twice as many Super Sport versions will come off the Molsheim assembly line in France

3. Not many are being made

You won’t see one of these on the road before next year – or ever, actually.

First deliveries are scheduled to start in early 2022 but only a small number are being produced.

Only 30 examples of the Super Sport 300+ were made – this more road-friendly version will be around twice that production volume. 

Add it to the list of Bugatti unicorn hypercars you will only seen cruising the streets of Monaco and Dubai. 

Fewer than 100 examples of the new Bugatti will be produced, meaning this will likely be another unicorn car from the French brand

The extended bodywork is to make the car more aerodynamically efficient so it can cut through the air like a missile

Powering the Super Sport is the same 8.0-litre W16 engine for the Chiron, though upgraded to produce an extra 99bhp – meaning it now puts out a massive 1,578bhp

4. It’s only the fifth Bugatti model to carry the Super Sport name

The first Super Sport name was given to a Bugatti in 1931. That was the legendary Type 55 Super Sport, originally shown to the public at the Paris Motor Show that year. Only 38 examples were made over a four-year period.

Bugatti didn’t construct the next version of the Super Sport until 1993 to 1995 with 39 examples of the stunning EB 110 Super Sport. 

The V12 turbocharged engine in the souped-up EB 110 delivered more than 602bhp and set multiple records in the 1990s, including a record speed of 218mph. 

The next Super Sport came two decades later with Bugatti’s best-selling model of all time, the Veyron.

The Veyron 16.4 Super Sport’s 1,183bhp was a crazy figure to fathom when it arrived in 2010, as was the top speed of 268mph – a record that remained unbeaten until four years later when the Hennessey Venom GT came along (270.4mph measured).

The fourth Super Sport was the Chiron Super Sport 300+ top-speed record holder. 

Only four other Bugatti’s have displayed the Super Sport name until now. The legendary 1931 Type 55 Super Sport (right), 1993 EB 100 Super Sport (second right), 2010 Veyron Super Sport (second left) and the Chiron Super Sport 300+ (not pictured). Far left is the latest model

This 1994 Bugatti EB110 Super Sport is one of just 30 made. It sold at an RM Sotheby’s classic car auction in 2019 for €2,030,000 – around £1.75m

This is the 2010 Veyron 16.4 Super Sport, which boasted 1,183bhp and a top speed of 268mph. It was the fastest road car in the world for four years

5. It has design elements that hark back to the iconic ’90s EB 110 Super Sport

Bugatti has made sure to include a few features for the new Chiron that are a nod back to previous Super Sport cars from its automotive archive.

For instance, the nine exhaust air holes on each fender replicate those that featured on the EB 110 Super Sport.

They’re functional too – they release the air pressure from the front wheel wells, thereby generating streamlined downforce at the front axle. Additional outlets behind the front wheel arches likewise help to balance out the aerodynamic loads, says the exotic car firm. 

Bugatti second ever Super Sport was the EB 110, with 39 examples built between 1993 to 1995. One of its most iconic features was the exhaust air holes flanking the engine bay

Bugatti has replicated the air holes by putting nine on each of the fenders of the new car – and faithful nod back to one of the most iconic models the brand has ever produced

The EB 100 Super Sport featured a V12 turbocharged engine that delivered more than 602bhp and set multiple records in the 1990s, including a record speed of 218mph

You can see all 18 of the air holes in the fenders in the overhead shot. They are functional too: they release the air pressure from the front wheel wells, thereby generating streamlined downforce at the front axle

6. It ‘s the joint most-powerful road car on the planet – and sheds a bulldog in weight compared to the standard Chiron 

The engine in the Chiron is a piece of art – and one that’s had a few touch-ups for this latest example.

Bugatti says it has ‘thoroughly overhauled’ the 8.0-litre W16 engine for the Chiron Super Sport, boosting its performance by 99bhp – meaning it now puts out a massive 1,578bhp.

Only the electric Lotus Evija (1,973bhp) and Rimac Nevera (1,888bhp) are more potent models on sale (or due to go on sale) with registration plates and indicators. 

The outrageously fast Koenigsegg Jesko matches the 1,578bhp output of both the Chiron Super Sport and Super Sport 300+ to be the joint most powerful combustion engine hypercars on the market.

Bugatti has shaved some 23kg of weight from the standard Chiron – which is the average bulk of an adult male bulldog

Only the electric Lotus Evija (1,973bhp), Rimac Nevera (1,888bhp) are more potent road-legal models on sale (or due to go on sale)

The outrageously fast Koenigsegg Jesko matches the 1,578bhp output of both the Chiron Super Sport and Super Sport 300+

At the same time the grunt has been upped, the weight has been slashed.

A substantial 23 kilograms has been trimmed from a standard Chiron – around the same bulk as a fully-grown male bulldog. 

Modifications have been made to the turbochargers, oil pump, and cylinder head with valve train, as well as to the transmission and clutch. 

‘We increased the revolutions per minute (rpm) for even greater longitudinal acceleration and an even more emotive driving experience,’ says Michael Kodra, head of drive development at Bugatti. 

The engine now red-lines at 7,100rpm – 300rpm higher than before – and peak torque of 1,600 newton meters is accessible from between 2,000 and 7,000rpm, rather than up to 6,000rpm, to make it more usable.

This incredible powerplant is mated to a seven-gear dual-clutch transmission. 

As is the case with all Bugatti models, the cabin is the most supreme luxury you’re ever going to see in a car

The monumental powerplant is linked to a rapid-shifting seven-gear dual-clutch transmission

7. It hits 186mph in the same time a Vauxhall Corsa goes from 0-to-62mph

Bugatti hasn’t confirmed the 0-to-62mph time of the Chiron Super Sport – probably because it can’t quite match the Rimac Nevera electric hypercar released last week.

The Croatian-made zero-emission hypercar hits the 62mph mark in a staggering 1.97 seconds – which is almost half a second faster than the Chiron Super Sport 300+ can do. 

This Chiron Super Sport accelerates from 0-to-124mph (200km/h) in 5.8 seconds and to 186mph (300km/h) in 12.1 seconds. To put that into perspective,the Bugatti can accelerate to over 186mph before a Vauxhall Corsa 1.2 (75PS) makes it to 62mph.  

The Chiron Super Sport also catapults from 0-to-249mph (400km/h) seven per cent quicker than a normal Chiron, says Bugatti. Essentially, not much on the road is going to beat you in a sprint from the lights.  

Slide me

In the time it takes a 1.2 petrol Vauxhall Corsa (left) to hit 62mph the Bugatti Chiron Super Sport will be doing over 186mph

Rimac Nevera VS Bugatti Chiron SuperSport 300+

Rimac Nevera (fastest accelerating road car)

Price: £2million  

Number built: 150 

Seats: 2

Length: 4750mm 

Width: 1986mm 

Height: 1208mm

0-62mph: 1.97 seconds  

0-124mph: 4.7 seconds

0-186mph: 9.3 seconds

Quarter-mile: 8.6 seconds (official)

Top speed: 258mph

Powertrain: 4 independent electric motors and lithium-manganese-nickel batteries  

Power: 1,888bhp

CO2 emissions: 0g/km (tailpipe) 

Bugatti Chiron SuperSport 300+ (road car with highest top speed)

Price: circa £4.2million 

Number built: 30 

Seats: 2

Length: 4420mm

Width: 1990mm

Height: 1212mm

0-62mph: 2.4 seconds

0-124mph: 6.5 seconds

0-186mph: 13.6 seconds

Quarter-mile: 9.4 seconds (measured by Car & Driver)

Top speed: 304.77mph

Engine: 8.0-litre quad-turbochaged W16 petrol

Power: 1,578bhp

CO2 Emissions: 516g/Km  

The Chiron Super Sport accelerates from 0-to-124mph (200km/h) in 5.8 seconds and to 186mph (300km/h) in 12.1 seconds

No slouch: The new Bugatti Chiron Super Sport accelerates from 0-to-249mph (400km/h) seven per cent quicker than a conventional £2.5m Chiron

8. ‘Long tail’ body add 25cm to the Chiron’s overall length 

To make sure the Chiron is as slippery as possible there is a long-tail bodywork. This is a quarter of a metre longer than the standard Chrion’s dimensions.

Almost all of the aggressive aero package bolted onto the Super Sport 300+ has gone, leaving a clean missile-like silhouette that looks super chic. 

This extended body boosts slipstream and dramatically reduces any wind resistance generated – factors which otherwise decelerate the vehicle. 

The shift to a longer shell – and the addition of a larger diffuser – means the exhaust tips have had to be repositioned. 

Bugatti has shifted the otherwise central exhaust system to the side, with the pipes aligned vertically. The exhaust system also sounds ‘deeper and richer’. As if a Bugatti Chiron wasn’t loud enough already.

The long tail bodywork bathing this beautiful hypercar adds a quarter of a metre to the standard Chiron model

The shift to a longer shell – and to make way for a larger diffuser – means the exhaust tips have had to be repositioned to the side

9. It’s wheely exclusive

There are a number of exclusive features you will only find on this limited edition Bugatti – and that includes the wheels.

These stunning aluminum, five-Y-spoke design rims are available only for the Chiron Super Sport and are also available in a diamond-cut option.  

These five-spoke wheels are exclusive to the Chiron Super Sport and are available in a standard aluminium finish or diamond cut

10. It features an electronically-controlled chassis that can firm the suspension in six milliseconds 

As well as a redesigned bodywork, Bugatti has also developed a new chassis specifically for the Chiron Super Sport’s high speeds and uprated aerodynamics.

It has harder springs than the standard Chiron to stabilise the vehicle when it’s travelling at 250mph and above. 

And the chassis can react to the situation quicker than you can blink: engineers additionally retuned the electronically controlled chassis so that it can regulate the settings in real-time in a matter of just six milliseconds. 

‘With the Chiron Super Sport, we are following our long-standing tradition of combining top speed with absolute luxury,’ explained Stephan Winkelmann, president of Bugatti, during the car’s unveiling on Tuesday. 

‘The Chiron Super Sport stands for increased comfort and elegance coupled with even greater performance and higher speeds. 

‘With this new creation, we established another distinct personality within the Chiron family. It is the essence of what we learned and developed in recent years – the ultimate grand tourer.’ 

Want one? The chances are the limited numbers means most would have already been promised to customers – who will start receiving them in the new year

Longer bodywork boosts its slipstream potential and dramatically reduces wind resistance generated – factors which otherwise decelerate the vehicle

Bugatti developed a new chassis specifically for the Chiron Super Sport’s high speeds and new aerodynamics

The electronically controlled chassis has been returned so that it can regulate the settings in real-time in a matter of just six milliseconds

CARS & MOTORING: ON TEST

This post first appeared on Daily mail

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